Category: Book Review Monday

…of all the founding fathers he may have been most essential in creating what our nation is today, good and bad…

It’s easy to see how this book, or rather the character of Alexander Hamilton inspired Lin-Manuel Miranda to write Hamilton, although the constraints of a musical means some of the best stories get left behind. Like the one about Benedict Arnold, who has already turned his coat when Washington and Hamilton and Lafayette show up…

Read more …of all the founding fathers he may have been most essential in creating what our nation is today, good and bad…

A first-class police procedural

The first-class police procedural is a rare thing indeed today, in both meanings of the word. This debut effort by Frederick Weisel qualifies right across the board. A young woman’s body is found by a lake in Santa Rosa, California, and Eddie Mahler’s Violent Crimes team responds to the scene. Eddie suspects she was murdered…

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Sixteen-year old Ree is one of the strongest and most admirable heroines I’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting.

Ree Dolly’s father is due for a court hearing and he has signed over the family home as bond. Now he’s missing, and the cops tell his sixteen-year old daughter that their home is forfeit if he doesn’t show. Ree, sole support and care-giver of a mother who has slipped her leash on sanity and…

Read more Sixteen-year old Ree is one of the strongest and most admirable heroines I’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting.

Every time Captain Pete says “Bless their hearts” you can hear his insincerity from here to the Kremlin.

The twelfth book in the Lydia Chin/Bill Smith series and one of the best so far. A fish out of water/stranger in a strange land story, with PI’s Lydia Chin and Bill Smith being hired (sort of) by Lydia’s mother to go to the aid of a relative in Mississippi who has been arrested for…

Read more Every time Captain Pete says “Bless their hearts” you can hear his insincerity from here to the Kremlin.

Through Pepys’ eyes we singe our eyebrows on the Great Fire of London and fear for our lives from the plague.

Not to be confused with Samuel Johnson, who wrote the dictionary, which I always do. No, this book is a biography of Samuel Pepys, who wrote the Diary. An up-from-nothing country boy, Pepys’ abilities and high-placed relatives put him at the center of English history for the last half of of the 1600’s. He witnessed…

Read more Through Pepys’ eyes we singe our eyebrows on the Great Fire of London and fear for our lives from the plague.

In between they’d drive around France and eat in great restaurants. In a more perfect world I would have been their child.

[my 2011 Goodreads review] I spent the summer of 1987 in Paris, studying beginning French at the Sorbonne and staying at the Cité Universitaire, in a program geared toward older students. Some of them wanted to take a cooking class, and the Sorbonne organized it for them. They needed one more student to make it…

Read more In between they’d drive around France and eat in great restaurants. In a more perfect world I would have been their child.