#thiswritinglife

This is what my dining table looks like these days. I’m beginning the third novel in the Eye of Isis series, and I’ve written enough of Tetisheri’s story now to revise her calendar. Calendars are very important in series–when did she do what, where, and to whom? Writing a calendar for the Kate Shugak novels,…

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#inmygarden

Continuing the yellow trend. That euphorbia this time last year was twice as big. Many of my flowers are at least a month late. Seven of my gorgeous firewitch dianthus are in what I sincerely hope is hibernation, not actually dead. Half of the grass in my yard is dead and I’ve bought a pair…

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Alien clones live among us.

Alien clones live among us, determined to help us get off planet mostly to escape the coming invasion of their own race. I think. Lots of fascinating 20th century history with fun author notes at the end telling us what’s true and what isn’t (hint: most of it is) and a great beginning to what…

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The Noble Nagoonberry

[from 2011] Some of you wanted to know what a nagoonberry was, so photo above is this berry of kings in the wild. It is a secretive little fruit, hiding its light in the deepest, darkest recesses of the forest, usually under air cover of a hundred or so squadrons of mosquitoes. That’s per plant.…

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#inmygarden

This was the first big bloom in my garden last year — a drift of pale yellow primrose. This is what it looks like this year. Yeah. This is what a long, cold spring looks like. #shiver

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Clearly this upward mobility, the possibility of self-realization so central to the idea of America, was closed to the slave unless and until he became a free man.

Goodwin puts Abraham Lincoln in the context of his peers, many of whom ran against him for the first Republican nomination for president (remember they’d just invented that party) and one of whom, Stanton, had treated him with outright contempt in a law case years before. Seward accepted the job of Secretary of State thinking…

Read more Clearly this upward mobility, the possibility of self-realization so central to the idea of America, was closed to the slave unless and until he became a free man.

An adventure novel, a history lesson, a love story, a cookbook, and a whole lot of fun.

An adventure novel, a history lesson, a love story, a cookbook, and a whole lot of fun. Really well written, with no sentimentality mucking up the narrative. These are not pirates with hearts of gold (“TO THE BOTTOM!”), and Owen Wedgewood is such a whiner and so determinedly blind to what is going on around…

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