Category: Book Review Monday

An extraordinary woman

An extraordinary story about an extraordinary woman who never got half the credit she deserved. She literally helped win WWII by organizing and fighting next to the French Résistance, first for the British SOE and then for the US OSS, and then came home to work for the CIA, which was run by a bunch…

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Traveling is always thought to be more enjoyable than moving: we envy foreign correspondents but pity army brats.

A dozen exceptionally well-written essays on disparate subjects such as coffee, mail and a biography of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. In “A Piece of Cotton,” an essay about the American flag, Fadiman writes, “In the weeks after September 11, I saw for the first time that the flag…has multiple meanings….The red, white, and blue turban worn…

Read more Traveling is always thought to be more enjoyable than moving: we envy foreign correspondents but pity army brats.

“All politics is local,” said some old pol, and local politics are the bloodiest politics there are.

Haines writer Heather Lende runs for a seat on her local assembly and wins, and the gates of mercy close behind her. She has barely warmed the seat of her chair before there is a recall petition being circulated against her and the two other new members of the assembly. Said recall fomented by incendiary…

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If you teach a natural born killer how to kill in war, what do you think he’s going to get up to when you declare peace?

[writing one review for a stellar trilogy] The setting is England. The first novel, River of Darkness, takes place soon after World War I, where a serial killer is charging into rural homes and slaughtering entire families. The second novel, The Blood-Dimmed Tide, takes place a decade later, in the depths of the Great Depression,…

Read more If you teach a natural born killer how to kill in war, what do you think he’s going to get up to when you declare peace?