He believed that secret operatives working on behalf of the U.N. had put directions in invisible ink on the backs of all government highway signs, readable only by U.N. troops wearing special government-issue goggles.

Excerpt from Hunter’s Moon, the ninth Kate Shugak novel:

The nearest neighbor to the gold mine was a man named Crazy Emmett who lived in a cabin on a tiny lake five miles away. Crazy Emmett, an ex-history teacher from West High School in Anchorage, had retired at his earliest possible date of eligibility and fled the city for the peace and security of Bush life. Years of teaching indifferent students had inured him to loneliness, while his study of history had led him to a deep-seated belief in the hidden agenda of the United Nations in collusion with the Trilateral Commission to take over all the world’s governments, thereby jeopardizing his Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms. He believed that secret operatives working on behalf of the U.N. had put directions in invisible ink on the backs of all government highway signs, readable only by U.N. troops wearing special government-issue goggles. Crazy Emmett saw everyone as the point man for the invasion and if you didn’t want to be used for target practice you kept your distance. George kept his distance.

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Chatter Kate Shugak Uncategorized

Dana View All →

Author and founder of Storyknife.org.

4 Comments Leave a comment

  1. I am fairly certain Crazy Emmett is taken from a cousin of mine, who believes every bohunk theory that comes down the pike. He actually believes the Sears and Roebuck Catalogue was discontinued because the FBI was using it for messages to people who were inserted into far right organizations, and got caught. Thank goodness, he lives a couple time zones away.

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